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Psychotherapist to pay $82K, cardiac care providers to pay over $80K for alleged Medicaid fraud

April 23, 2019, Baltimore, MD — Maryland Attorney General Brian Frosh announced two settlements over Medicaid fraud with cardiac and psychotherapy care providers.

Five cardiac care providers have agreed to pay $81,234.80 to resolve allegations that they submitted false claims for Medicaid services.

The following cardiac care providers will pay:

Cardiac Associates, P.C., a practice with offices in Rockville, Olney, Laurel and Germantown, paid $30,143.20;
Horizon Vascular Specialists, with locations in Olney, Rockville, Frederick and Germantown, paid $26,113.50;
St. Agnes Healthcare, Inc. of Baltimore paid $19,868.10;
Riverside Medical Associates of Riverdale paid $3,152;
Maryland Specialty Group, a Glenn Dale-based practice, paid $1,958.
The Attorney General’s Medicaid Fraud Control Unit alleged the providers submitted false claims to Medicaid for two similar procedures on the same day for the same patient when only one procedure was actually performed.

The providers administered tests to patients to assess the “sufficiency of veins in the lower extremities” but also billed for an additional outmoded test no longer in use by most cardiac providers.

The providers also reached settlements with the federal government.

A psychotherapist in Gaithersburg has agreed to pay $82,000 to resolve allegations that he submitted false claims for Medicaid services, Maryland Attorney General Brian Frosh announced Tuesday.

The Attorney General’s Medicaid Fraud Control Unit alleged that from January 1, 2013, through May 31, 2017, M. Wagdi Attia, M.D., submitted claims to Medicaid for psychotherapy services requiring certain amounts of face-to-face time with the patient when actually, Attia’s time-stamped medical records showed he provided less than the required amount of time.

The State also alleged Attia’s medical records failed to reflect the provision of all elements of the psychotherapy services required, and the use of repetitive language and stock phrases in his medical charts casts doubt on the actual services provided.

Attia retired from practicing medicine and agreed not to renew his lapsed license or Medicaid privileges, according to his settlement.

Attia also reached a settlement with the federal government.

Source: CBS Baltimore

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