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Why dishonest claims turn violent

Claimant mugs adjuster, showing danger to fraud fighters Continue reading

Prentice Ponds was trapped. He bought a damaged Chevy Camaro on eBay, then did a dumb thing. The Tulsa man billed his auto insurer for repairs, lying he crashed the car after buying it.

A suspicious insurer adjuster came to his Tulsa home for a chat. Mark Frayne had the original eBay photos. That damage matched the crunched auto parts in photos Ponds gave Repwest Insurance.

Ponds panicked and beat up Frayne — breaking his ribs, lacerating his head, and stealing his claim evidence. The jury came down hard. Ponds got life in state prison for the assault and robbery, and 25 years for the insurance plot.

Fraud fighters often put their safety and even lives on the line. Insurance cheaters can be panicky, jittery, unhinged when interviewed in the field. Jail’s coming on fast, their careers and jobs lost. They lash out, somehow thinking a fist or gun will bail them out of a conviction.

Kim Sledge and Rhett Jeansonne were respected investigators for the Louisiana insurance department. They knocked on the office door of an insurance agent suspected of stealing client premiums. The agent ambushed Kim and Rhett. He gunned them down, then shot himself.

Sallie Rohrbach was an auditor for the North Carolina insurance department. She was reviewing the books of an agent who might’ve stolen client premiums. Michael Howell clubbed Sallie to death with a chair in his office.

Fraudsters have ordered hits on witnesses, tried to bully them from testifying, and even plotted to murder judges. Fortunately the hits didn’t come off, though were just one trigger pull from erasing lives.

So let’s applaud fraud fighters, who know violence can come with their next knock on a door. Let’s also rethink insurance fraud. A few small, silly claims? Tell that to neighbors who’ve died in botched home insurance arsons. And especially, tell it to the families who Kim, Rhett and Sallie left behind.

About the author: Jim Quiggle is director of communications for the Coalition Against Insurance Fraud.

 

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