Lemons or lemonade?

First P2P insurer says it will slash fraud costs

Lemonade_appDo insurance consumers have a thirst to buy policies using their smartphones? Will they be less fraud-prone knowing some of their excess premiums get donated to charity? And will the prospects of quick claim cash motivate them to switch carriers?

One new insurance startup is betting yes, offering to quench that thirst.

Lemonade, the first so-called peer-to-peer insurance company, debuted this week to much fanfare.

Started by technology entrepreneurs, the company is targeting smartphone users by offering ease-of-service transitions and cheap prices on homeowners and renters coverage.

Lemonade says most insurance “sucks” (their words) because insurers hassle claimants, are bloated and make too much profit. And thus, claimants are more likely to file inflated or fake claims.

The company says it will undercut traditional insurers by using streamlined, tech-oriented transactions and reduced fraud costs. In an interview this week, Lemonade president Shai Wininger said:

“With insurance, over 90 percent of the fraud is perpetrated by supposedly normal upstanding citizens like you and me. So what is about insurance that brings out the devil in us? Why is it that when it comes to insurance, we feel entitled to break the law?” 

Research suggests consumers are less likely to defraud a company they feel good about. Customers designate a favorite charity to receive their share of company profits at the end of the year, if there are any.

Call me skeptical, but I doubt Lemonade’s approach will make that much difference in policy pricing.

Still, Millennials who love transacting business on their cellphones and are socially conscious should be drawn to this model. It will be interesting to see if Lemonade has a magic formula to reduce fraud. We’ll be watching to see if this new player leaves a sweet or sour taste in the mouths of its customers.

About the author: Dennis Jay is executive director of the Coalition Against Insurance Fraud.

911 scammers victimized everyone

Fake deaths, bogus damage among the exploitive claims

twin_towersOne postscript to last week’s emotional 911 remembrances is that some folks with little conscience tried to exploit the tragedy by lodging dirty insurance scams.

Every disaster — whether by airliner smart bomb or Ma Nature’s hurricanes  — brings out a sordid bunch who see dancing dollar signs amid the strewn rubble.

The 911 scams were especially sordid because they played off of incalculable human suffering. Less than a week after 3,000 Americans died fiery deaths, Charles Gavett sadly told life insurers that his beloved wife Cynthia had perished in the collapse.

Cynthia was finishing a job interview with the investment firm Cantor Fitzgerald when a hijacked airliner plowed into the gleaming tower, Charles insisted. Cynthia hadn’t been seen since, and Charles sought more than $628,000 to help salve his grief.

How touching … except Cynthia was quite alive and well. She and Charles were living openly in Concord, Ga.

They figured insurers wouldn’t investigate claims involving such a profound national tragedy.

But insurers did investigate. Cynthia even invited a sheriff’s deputy over for the Thanksgiving holiday. The court invited the Gavetts over for 10-year jail terms.

Elderly New York City millionaire Beatrice Kaufman owned a $5-million apartment in Manhattan. She tried to charge insurers and charities about $1 million for renovations to her apartment and non-existent damage to her lawyer-recruiting business office.

Kaufman claimed the attacks forced her to leave her apartment and business for months. She racked up huge bills staying at a swanky hotel. In fact, she moved out before the attacks while renovating her unit. She tried to connive insurers into paying for the work. Kaufman received 52 weekends in an un-renovated jail cell.

In West Chester, Ohio, a man filed a $100,000 life-insurance claim, saying his father died when the Towers went down. His father lived in India.

People tried to bilk charities and relief agencies as well. Dozens of scams quickly showed up. Con artists hoped to quickly slip make-believe stories through the system amid the confusion after the Towers and Pentagon erupted in flames.

Expect similar cons as the Hurricane Hermine floodwaters retreat. You may see claims for flooded cars that drivers purposefully left near the beach. A Florida man filled his six-figure Rolls Royce with a garden hose after Katrina, claiming it was flood-damaged. Claim denied.

Floodwaters carried away (untraceable) high-priced home electronics, supposed Hermine victims might claim. Wind and debris and siding wrecked roofs that the homeowners damaged themselves.

Insurers are on high alert. They want to pay honest claims. Likely they’ll quickly pay as many claims as possible to make homeowners whole. Then the insurers will circle back to investigate claims that bears warning signs of fraud. Some blatant scams will be denied right up front.

So what can you do?

Aside from the obvious — don’t scam because insurers rightfully are watching — why look the other way when a neighbor brags about a Hermine scam, or any insurance con? Report them to the insurance department.

Honest Americans are trying to put their lives back together. Nobody needs knuckleheads taking the easy way out while the vast majority of Hermine victims play fair.

Americans suffer enough after unfathomable disasters. We all grieve for the victims. Insurance scammers who exploit human tragedy are an affront to all of us.

About the author: Jim Quiggle is director of communications for the Coalition Against Insurance Fraud.

Insurers urged to report cases

An open letter from state fraud bureaus to insurers

shane-guyant_09-16Hello from Venus. To my neighbors from Mars, the NAIC’s Anti-Fraud Task Force discussed last week how we all have noticed a decline in referrals state fraud bureaus are receiving from insurer victims. Howard Goldblatt’s followup FraudBlog pursued that theme constructively.

Notice I used the word victim. We consider insurers just that, a victim.

Now we agree with SIU directors that the “black hole” still exists in some instances.  We find ourselves concentrating so hard on cases that make the cut that we often forget to give you feedback. We really don’t want you to stop reporting because you are weary of the “black hole.”

State fraud bureaus also hope you remember your obligation to report cases to us. Some states even have made it a crime not to report. Let me stress that reporting to us should not feel like an obligation. You should have faith that we will do the best we can to fight insurance fraud and make sure that every state’s residents are protected from paying for those who break the law.

We have really tried hard over the past few years to give you options to report to us in a convenient manner. Many of you have offered excellent and appreciated suggestions. We have listened to your input, and have implemented many of your ideas. We know the process is not always perfect, though it is getting better.

We have partnered with organizations such as the Coalition to educate you on how to report insurance fraud to us. We certainly welcome any dialogue that can put this issue to rest. I actually asked Howard this week for help in reaching out to you. We want to be the first to step up and ask that you join us in a dialogue that can help us serve all states’ residents while preserving your business interests.

I must say that we have a strong group of fraud directors across this great country. We are committed to eliminating insurance fraud. We are meeting in Seattle, Wash. in a few weeks. I am sure this issue will be discussed at length. We really seek your help. We are all in, over here in Venus.

About the author: Shane Guyant is director of the Criminal Investigations Division of the North Carolina Department of Insurance. He also chairs the NAIC’s Antifraud Task Force.

Insurers from Mars, fraud bureaus Venus?

More common ground needed on reporting, acting on suspected scams

Fraud_bureaus_SIU_blogI just returned from the NAIC’s summer meeting. It included the antifraud task force meeting, attended mostly by directors of state insurance fraud bureaus. I also met with insurer SIU directors before the NAIC event.

I felt as if I’d entered a time warp. Discussions at both meetings reminded me of a breakout session I chaired at a Coalition summit more than a decade ago on the status of insurance fraud fighting. SIU directors and fraud bureau directors both attended.

The main discussion by insurers then was about the “black hole” of information sharing. Insurers said they send cases to fraud bureaus for investigation, and never hear a word back. The fraud bureaus contend insurers send them weak cases, or ones not well-vetted.

That’s what I heard last week as well. Insurers seemed at a loss about what happens to their cases they refer to fraud bureaus. And, several fraud bureaus grumbled about the lack of good referrals from insurers.

Insurers and fraud bureaus clearly need better dialogue so everyone fully understands each other’s needs.

One fraud bureau chief talked about how a few insurers in his state haven’t reported a suspected scam in years, even though reporting is mandatory. Are those insurers doing such a good job that nobody’s trying to scam them anymore? Doubt that.

Insurance-fraud laws broadly define the crime, though there’s no definition of suspected insurance fraud. Each insurer could have its own definition, which determines which and how many cases it sends to the fraud bureau.

Most insurers don’t report all suspected frauds. We understand that. Besides, fraud bureaus don’t have the staff to handle every case. But for an insurer to say it has no suspected frauds to report does a disservice to the larger fraud-fighting community and our common cause.

Fraud bureau directors and SIU leaders need to come together, develop a greater understanding and find more common ground so they can work jointly to combat fraud in the most efficient and effective ways possible.

We urge both sides to reach out to the other to make that happen.

About the author: Howard Goldblatt is director of government affairs for the Coalition Against Insurance Fraud.

Taming the workers-comp monster in California

Crooked providers, lien setup bleed comp system

If you need more proof the workers-comp system in California is a mess, look no further than the report this week that indicted and convicted medical providers filed more than $600 million in liens against workers-comp claims.

The lien system in the state continues to be fertile ground for fraud. Designed as a safety net to ensure injured workers get treated, it’s now a slush fund for crooked medical providers and lawyers.

Fraud and abuse are rife in Southern California, where medical rings are targeting just-retired workers, says one insurance exec who wrote us this week. Runners hang out at Social Security offices and other venues frequented by retirees. They entice the retirees to file claims by offering free medical care and a windfall to supplement retirement income. The retirees are brought to lawyers’ offices, signed up and then shuttled off to medical offices for “treatment.”

The number of worker “injuries” occurring on the last day of the job is rising, this exec says.

Legislation to help weed some of these abusive providers out of the system is cruising through the California legislature. The bill would ban providers who’ve been kicked out of Medicare and Medicaid for over-billing. The bill sponsor says there’s evidence that crooked docs banned from government health plans have turned to workers comp to ply their trade.

The sponsor also says his legislation will target lawyers who sign up comp clients, but never actually interview them, then file claims for them in distant cities and ultimately settle the cases for their fees — often without the workers’ knowledge.

The legislation is a good idea, but much more needs to be done. Workers compensation in California is a huge, complex multi-faceted program. There are no easy answers on how insurers, employers, policymakers and others can hit that sweet spot of minimizing fraud while making sure injured workers get the treatment they deserve. But finding a better way than the lien system might be a good start.

About the author: Dennis Jay is executive director of the Coalition Against Insurance Fraud.

Unwise Wise Guys purloin insurance money?

Mafia busts another sign that big crime rings have big ideas for fraud

Reputed mobsters from the Luchese, Bonnano and Genovese crime families were busted up and down the East Coast last week.

The epic lasso roped nearly 50 suspected hoods, including high-ranking capos who called the shots.

Extortion, gambling, loansharking, muggings and other standard Mafia schemes were alleged in the federal indictments.

Unwise wiseguys?

What stood out was health-insurance fraud. The gangsters allegedly convinced docs to write “unnecessary and excessive” prescriptions for expensive compound creams. Allied docs overbilled insurers and received kickbacks, the feds say.

Street hoods turning to respectable white-collar crime?

“Many of the Italian mafia families across the nation have sought to diversify their interests into more high-tech, white-collar crimes for a while now, dating back, really, to the 1980s,” mob expert Scott Burnstein tells Vice. “Smart mobsters in this day and age no longer just line their pockets with traditional rackets (gambling, loansharking, extortion) — and some try to stay away all together. When you compare prison sentences, it makes the most sense.”

Organized crime sinking its grubby paws into insurance fraud is a known phenomenon. The Coalition has tracked the trend for years. Complex rings, and ethnic gangs such as Russians and Armenians, have gotten rich from staged crashes, inflated health-insurance claims, medical ID theft and other insurance rackets.

The latest busts add new insights into how the Mafia itself may be larding family ledgers with insurance crime.

Drug dealers and other street types are branching into insurance crime. It’s safer, more-profitable and less likely to earn you a bullet to the head in a dark alley, they reason. Same often holds true for larger crime rings.

All this is hardly surprising. Corporations inevitably follow a good money-making idea. They add efficiencies and scale, thus magnifying profits. This is as true of insurance fraud as honest entrepreneurial ventures such as coffee, copier and hamburger franchises.

There always will be a generous niche for mom-and-pop fraudsters — average consumers who inflate claims for “lost” engagement rings or “stolen” sound systems.

It’s the corporate fraud players who may be the most dangerous. In addition to size and organization, many complex rings could have resources to bring in tech-savvy players who can hack and breach insurers.

Sensor-driven devices such as telematics also may be hackable, thus allowing hi-tech crash rings to alter data and seemingly legitimize setup car wrecks. Shifting alliances among fraud rings with differing skill sets likely will surface. Align medical providers with breach techies and the theft potential is great.

The Mafia may not be the unstoppable octopus of yore. Yet the upcoming Mafia trials still will give fraud fighters useful field intel on the threat they’re up against. They’d be smart to watch closely and mine for actionable insights. Whether the Mafia is a bit fraud player or serious actor, they’re another reminder that size does matter with insurance fraud.

About the author: Jim Quiggle is director of communications for the Coalition Against Insurance Fraud.

Fraud fighters must get in legislative game

Play strong role in enacting stronger state fraud laws

Two truths will govern our success in getting strong state fraud laws onto the books: We must prepare our 2017 legislative agenda now; waiting until December or January is too late. Fraud fighters also can play a pivotal role in getting fraud bills on the front burner in many states.

We’re in an election year, with less than 90 days until we vote for a new president and Congress. We’ll also vote for quite a few state legislators, and a handful of governors.

We tend to be Washington-centric, thinking that who we put into the White House and Congress will affect us the most.

Actually, most of us are directly affected more by what happens in our state capitals than in Washington. Fraud fighters thus should be alert to creating opportunities in our own backyards.

The Coalition is using the summer to plan the states where there’s the  strongest need for new fraud laws — and a solid chance we can get bills enacted into law.

The Coalition’s government affairs committee meets this week to discuss the best hotspot states. Later this month, I’ll be on a conference call with state IASIU chapters. We’ll discuss the grassroots role that fraud fighters can play in writing their legislators in key target states next year.

The best way to convince insurers to make anti-fraud bills a priority in a given state is to make a business case why statehouse efforts are in everyone’s best interests.

Let me know if you think your state is a prime candidate for strong fraud bills in 2017. Partnerships among fraud fighters and other allies give us the best chance of success.

Together, we can make a difference.

About the author: Howard Goldblatt is director of government affairs for the Coalition Against Insurance Fraud.

Limiting Medicare billing may weed out cheaters

Home-health and medical transport companies in crosshairs

What to make of the federal government extending its moratorium on allowing new medical providers to bill Medicare and Medicaid in six states?

Does CMS still need to get a handle on pre-screening providers before allowing them to bill?

Or is fraud is so rampant in those areas that CMS must weed out existing bad actors before allowing new providers to enter?

Probably both.

Shutting down enrollment is a drastic move that can hurt honest providers. It also can limit patient access to needed care. But it’s a necessary step for the federal government to  effectively manage fraud in its programs.

The areas affected by the extension include home-healthcare and medical transport — two that are rife with fraud.

Congress gave CMS the power to shut down enrollments a few years ago, but CMS hesitated at first. Nudged by Congress, CMS started restricting enrollments in limited areas where fraud was most out of control.

The enrollments seem to be a qualified success, but it will take a few years to fully know if provider fraud has started moving downward.

In the meantime, CMS is taking a smart approach to using its power to restrict enrollments. Moratoria are targeted. The latest extensions, for example, impose home-health enrollment limits in Florida on just three of the worst counties. Plus, CMS now allows exceptions to the moratoria if providers pass heightened screening.

Taking action before crooked providers can bill is the best answer to the old “pay-and-chase” model. It should also deter many would-be cheaters, especially organized fraud rings looking to soak federal programs.

About the author: Dennis Jay is executive director of the Coalition Against Insurance Fraud.

Celebs draw fentanyl addict headlines

Reminds that insurance fraud helps finance opioid epidemic

Reminds that insurance fraud helps finance opioid epidemic

First came Prince, who died from an overdose of the painkiller fentanyl in his Minnesota home.

Next came singer Chaka Khan. She beat the reaper by entering into rehab this month, along with her sister.

The Grammy winner admitted fentanyl is her escape drug of choice. Chaka wisely gave up her summer concert appearances to focus on getting clean.

“The battle of addiction is a serious and long process, which is why I chose to address my use of prescription medications — which came about as a result of the knee surgery I had a few years ago,” she said.

Fentanyl is one of latest prescription painkillers to grab headlines. It’s used for severe pain, and is approved for longterm treatment. The stuff also is up to 100 times stronger than morphine, and 50 times stronger than heroin.

Fentanyl quickly shoots into the bloodstream. Dopamine then elevates, stoking the brain’s reward areas. The sweet euphoria grows into dependence, then addiction.

States like New Jersey and Mississippi are reporting spikes in fentanyl overdose deaths.

Insurance fraud is the largely untold story. It’s helping finance America’s epidemic of opioid addiction — billions of stolen insurance dollars worth.

Some fentanyl addicts reportedly are scamming health insurers to score prescriptions that feed the need. Same with other painkillers such as hydrocodone, or anti-anxiety meds and muscle relaxants.

Insurance scams may or may not have funded Prince’s or Chaka’s highs. Yet scams still are part of the bigger opioid picture, so we should be very concerned.

Insurers are stepping up investigations, plus education of doctors and patients to head off addiction. Law enforcement is going after shady pain clinics and pharmacies that dole out insurer-paid scripts.

Still, we risk getting exhausted by it all. We’re subject to steady parades of news stories about people dying from insurance-paid overdoses. Plus welcome busts of cold-blooded pain docs. They’re keeping addicts fed with pills — are we getting fed up?

Sadly, it may take a celeb’s drug death or rehab to keep headlines fresh and the public concerned. Let’s stay concerned, whether it’s a Grammy winner or small-town factory worker just trying to get clean.

About the author: Jim Quiggle is director of communications for the Coalition Against Insurance Fraud.

Dodging auto premiums should be crime

Lying about garaging vehicles burdens honest drivers

Summer driving season is in full swing. It’s a reminder that dishonest drivers are illicitly registering their vehicles in states where premiums are lower. The Coalition is calling for states to go after these drivers.

Using out-of-state addresses to insure a car illegally reduces the driver’s auto premiums. It also burden honest insurance consumers who insure their vehicles with their real address. They may pay higher auto premiums thanks to drivers who cheat the system.

North Carolina was the first state to tackle this issue by requiring new insureds to show proof of residence before an insurer could write a policy. Out-of-staters were registering their vehicles in North Carolina for the lower auto premiums.

North Carolina recently went a step further and put more teeth in the existing law. Trucking firms are falsely registering their fleets in the state yet have no operations there. The new law requires businesses to prove they ply the roads in the Tar Heel state.

Falsely registering vehicles in New Jersey is a specific insurance crime.

The Coalition seeks a similar law in New York. Bills have stalled, though we and our partners there are planning to reboot in 2017.

A Maryland bill would’ve let insurers rescind policies of drivers who falsely registered their vehicles in the state. The state held a public meeting. An insurer told about a claimed loss in Maryland by an insured who lived in New York — where the insurer doesn’t write coverage. The insurer paid the claim to avoid a baseless yet potentially costly bad-faith suit.

The statehouse will revisit legislation in 2017.

The Coalition strongly supports targeting auto rate evasion. Tough state laws can remove a driver’s incentive to take the risk.  Consumers who lie about where they drive to lower their auto premiums add burdens to the many thousands of honest drivers. This undermines the integrity of the auto-insurance system.

Fraud fighters have taken the forefront on this issue. Stay alert to auto-premium evasion in your state. Tell the Coalition and your state insurance department. Falsely registering a vehicle should be a ticket to jail, not an easy source of summer spending money.

About the author: Howard Goldblatt is director of government affairs for the Coalition Against Insurance Fraud.